CLAYTON EVANS

Sunday, 11 February 2018

REFLECTION ON READING WEEK


Having two weeks off for reading week was something that I thought I would enjoy. Of course I have enjoyed not having to get up for a 9am lecture, and being able to go out whenever I want with no worry about what I have going on the next day. However the lack of routine is something that I just get a little bored of. I found myself bored a lot of the time, which explains why my bank account is running a lot lower than normal. Takeout, going out for a 'few drinks', nipping to the shops for some snacks for movie night, ANYTHING to entertain me for 5 minutes. 



All that said, I did have tasks to complete. It's not called reading week for no reason. The label 'reading week' put the fear into me. I don't know what it is, but I just can't sit still and read a book for that long especially at uni where there is distractions for an A* procrastinator around every single corner. But I managed to get through it I suppose. To be honest, I did enjoy watching the documentaries and I especially enjoyed reading 'Hegarty on Creativity- There are No Rules' and I think that was because it wasn't an intense read. I think, what it is that puts me off reading, is the idea that you don't know how long you are going to have to read for. With a documentary, you put it on and you know its on for an hour and a half, followed by half an hour writing a blog post. With reading, for me anyway, it can literally take DAYS because I just get so distracted. 

Despite all of this, I did learn a lot from the previous two weeks, funnily enough, not just about books and fashion, but about how I'm going to move forward with this new project with a completely different mind set. 

THANK YOU 

CLAYTON EVANS
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8 THINGS IM GOING TO DO AFTER READING 'HEGARTY ON CREATIVITY'


I have recently read the book 'HEGARTY ON CREATIVITY- THERE ARE NO RULES' by Thames and Hudson. The book has inspired me in many ways that I have listed below. 


1. NO SUCH THING AS ORIGINALITY 
One thing that really fascinated me is the idea of something being 'FRESH' rather than 'ORIGINAL.' Originality is something that no-one can ever really achieve because everything is inspired by something else. It is still important to be daring and different and keep ideas exciting, but originality is something that ill no longer concern me. 

2. SIMPLICITY 
I always over think the meaning behind ideas and go into way too much detail too early on. Ive learnt that stripping it back and keeping things simplistic can result in amazing creative ideas.  

3. ANGER 
Now this shocked me. Using anger was something I didn't expect to see in this book, but it makes perfect sense. Anger can be a positive emotion when it comes to creativity. The idea of getting angry and passionate about making a wrong, right, can result in amazing work. 

4. CYNICISM 
Negativity restricts ideas. I know that I need to surround myself with positive people and when people are not positive, I just need to move on from them. Despite this, i don't think that people should be scared to criticise anything for fear of being labeled a cynic however, personally, wether I like an idea or not I continue to stay positive about things to ensure the best results. If someone is offended then the team doesn't work effectively. I just think its about balance. Ensuring you can criticise in a positive way. JUST BE KIND. 

5. FIND MY CREATIVE PHILOSOPHY 
I have learnt that it is important to find my own creative philosophy. Despite it being important, it is vital that I don't put pressure on myself to find it. It will come, naturally, through my work and my progress.

6. TAKE OUT MY HEADPHONES 
I have heard this one before but I haven really realised the importance of it. I need to engage with everything that is going on around me. Inspiration can be found anywhere. You don't have to look for it because often, if your open to it, it will find you. So really, I'm actually making life more difficult for myself and I should just take my headphones off. 

7. DONT DWELL ON FAILURE 
Failure is something that no-one wants to experience. From reading the book I think I'm going to try and think about failure in a different way. Everyone tells you to learn from your mistakes and failures, but sometimes, in terms of creativity, its best to just move on and forget it. Sometimes daring ideas don't work. Dwelling on it and trying to find a lesson you can learn from it is almost a waste of time. 

8. LIVE IN THE MOMENT 
I am 100% that person that has a 10 year plan including, marriage, babies and a career. Ive learnt from reading this book that this mindset does nothing but limit your possibilities and creative output. I need to live in the moment and not think too far ahead. I would say that is pretty manageable for me. 

THANK YOU 

CLAYTON EVANS 

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CLOTHES TO DIE FOR: DOCUMENTARY


On April 24th, 2013, one of the worst industrial disasters of the 21st century took place and it amazes me that I knew nothing about it. Was it because my 14 year old self was too obsessed with getting invited to the latest house party, rather than paying attention to the world around me? Probably. When watching the documentary on Kanopy, I had no idea that 80% of Bangladesh's exports are due to the clothing industry, providing many jobs for the Bangladeshi people. It is crazy to think that almost everyone owns something made in Bangladesh. 


The Rana Plaza collapsed in 2013 killing more than 1,000 people and around 2,400 left injured.The plaza was owned by the power hungry man, Sohel Rana. This was a man that intimidated many people due to his power as his followers gave him high status and power over people due to his wealth. The building housed many manufacturing workshops that mass produced product, cheaply, for western companies such as Primark, Matalan and Bonmarché

On the day of the event many workers attended the plaza that morning despite the crack and bent pillar that had been reported the day before. The workers attended through fear of loosing their wage and also because Sohel Rana and his people insisted that the building had been seen and they were ensured that it was safe for another 100 years. Of course this was false. The building started to collapse after a power cut caused the generator to turn on which then caused the building to vibrate. It took lesson than 90 seconds for the 8 story building, full of workers, to collapse.

Before the building collapsed the people that worked there didn't have the best life. They were often mistreated in their place of work. The job was strenuous and extremely fast paced, making a minimum of 100 shirts/trousers in an hour. It consisted of late nights and early starts for small wages at around £3.80. Young girls were hid in toilets upon arrival of buyers as they were not supposed to work there. It concerns me that this happens to these people just because it is cheap for western companies. It almost cheapens the lives of the people that died in this horrific event. I can't help but feel as though everyone, despite many being unaware at the time, were part of this problem. We were all guilty of buying clothes in mass because they were cheap, not really caring about the reasoning behind the low pricing. 

After the disaster, Primark donated 9 millions to the survivors and the families of the dead. Other companies made smaller donations. Since then, some western companies inspect the buildings in which their clothes are being made to ensure that this never happens again. The saddest part about this, is that these people live a completely different life to me and despite the fear attached to working in places like the Rana Plaza, Bangladeshi people still do. Its because its all they have and they need money to support themselves and their families.  

THANK YOU 

CLAYTON EVANS
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Saturday, 10 February 2018

DRIES: THE DOCUMENTARY


Whilst browsing Netflix for a documentary to watch I came across a number of documentaries that intrigued me. I watched a few clips from each but it was the asymmetric lines, contrasting colours of the Dries Van Noten Summer 2015 collection that drew me into watching the 2017 documentary 'Dries.' The opening snippet that showcased the women's collection being displayed on a mossy catwalk in which, at the end, all the models take a seat or lay on top of the moss as part of the finale, really intrigued me into wanting to know more about this brand that I hadn't really heard much about beforehand.

I am so glad that I watched this documentary as I have found a brand that I find so fascinating! The clothes are phenomenal and instantly recognisable due to the garish prints, florals, clashing patterns and colours and embroidery. Its all of these elements that make the brand so special. The fact that the embroidery is created and developed in an Indian workshop is intriguing to me. Often over sea manufacturing can have negative connotations but I think it is very interesting that Dries talks about how he wants to include lots of embroidery as part of his brand to create work for the Indian people that he has developed a good, working relationship with. 

One of the biggest parts of the brand is the role of the woman. The emphasis is on how women can take the clothes from the runway and wear them however they want, in numerous different ways. Dries describes a lot of his collections based around a female character. For example, his Spring 2016 collection was based on the idea of a flamboyant woman that drinks cocktails in the afternoon. The brand really fits the maximalism era that we are moving into and this is evident from the photographs below. 


After watching the documentary I found that one of the most intriguing parts of the brand is the Belgian designer himself, Dries Van Noten. He doesn't fit the mould of the typical, glamorous, surrounded by A-listers, eccentric creative directors that you see in the likes of big fashion houses such as Chanel and Balmain. He lives a simple life with his partner of 30 years, Patrick Vangheluwe, who works alongside him as part of his team, and his airedale terrier, Harry. He spends his time picking flowers from his garden which, like his home, replicates the maximalism trend that you see so clearly within his collections. One thing that Dries spoke about particularly was that you should constantly be aware of your surroundings as you can be inspired by anything. In fact, a lot of elements from his collections come from complete coincidence. He spoke about looking at ugly things that you don't find visually appealing and taking inspiration from them as it is the things you don't originally see that with development can become something beautiful. 


THANK YOU

CLAYTON EVANS

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DESIGN IN A NUTSHELL

The website 'Brain Pickings' presents the idea of the 6 major creative movements that form 'Design in a Nutshell." It is these movements that have developed architecture, culture and fashion. 


GOTHIC REVIVAL: 
The rise in a Church of England society resulted in many gothic revival churches being built which developed architecture at the time. The gothic revival movement stemmed beyond just architecture, it became a part of everyday life from wealthy peoples clothing to newspapers and furniture. The buildings were embellished with holy crosses, arches and quatrefoils that are present within gothic fashion seen on the runway recently. The photographs below are from the 2016 Dolce and Gabbana runway that clearly replicates the gothic revival movement. 
ARTS AND CRAFTS: 
The arts and crafts movement was a rebellion against machinery and the negative impact of industrialisation.  People felt as though it was taking away from the skill it took to be a craftsman and it was causing a lack of creativity. The movement created lots of home wear that wasn't perfect, and the idea was that you could see that it was made by hand. As a society we still care about how our things are made. Wether it is to do with ethics or the quality of the product.  

BAUHAUS: 
This movement reached its peak in between the two world wars in Germany. The word bauhaus is a German word that translates as "house of construction" or "school of building." It was basically a new form of art school. The difference from previous art schools, was that it combined lots of elements of art including fashion design, pottery, architecture and graphic design. The school was closed down by a very conservative Germany, yet it was one of the most celebrated art schools in the world. It was the students of Bauhaus that had the minimalistic mind set which is what has become a prominent part of todays fashion trends in garments and home wear. 

MODERNISM: 
The modernism movement applied to all sorts of different creative outlets, including art, literature, music and even poetry. The movement was argued to be the single most influential movement of the 20th century and the idea behind it is that you can DESIGN a better society. It was a time in which radical thinking was celebrated. 

AMERICAN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN: 
This movement emerged after the great depression erased consumer demand and it is effectively a different form of creativity. It wasn't about creating something new and exciting, it was about taking things that had already been invented and making them more desirable. Objects that were a daily necessity that had no real reason to be desirable such as hair dryers and toasters were becoming something that was almost like an accessory to the home. It was about making undesirable objects look great and therefore people would re-buy them. It's this movement that created product promotion as we know it today; creating advertisements and having stories behind an object to make items part of a lifestyle.  

POSTMODERNISM: 
Post modernism was movement created due to the failure of the modernism movement. The major difference between the two movement was that modernism felt that less was more whereas postmodernism felt that more is more. This is evident in fashion trends today with the clear transition from minimalism to maximalism. Post modernists aimed to create things that were fascinating and interesting to look at  and made the viewer have questions. An example of architecture created in this movement is the Las Vegas strip with the many fascinating forms of architecture. With mass media becoming a huge part of everyones lives  it really helped the movement take off and people were excited and intrigued. Artists such as Banksy and performers such as Lady GaGa are examples of people adapting the postmodernism movement. 


THANK YOU 

CLAYTON EVANS



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Sunday, 21 January 2018

NEW YORK STYLE DIARY: OUTFIT 3



COAT - ASOS / ROLL NECK - TOPMAN (similar) / T-SHIRT - ASOS / TROUSERS - ASOS / SUNGLASSES - ASOS / TRAINERS - CONVERSE 







This coat was NECESSARY. New York is so cold at this time of year, and despite getting lucky with a bit of sun, it still wasn't the warmest. These photographs were taken on top of the Rockefella centre. This outfit is again, experimenting with colour, specifically orange. The colour is so vibrant and it is probably my favourite colour at the moment. After finding the sunglasses online for only £1.50 this outfit quickly fell into place and I'm extremely happy with how it all worked out haha. 

THANK YOU 

CLAYTON EVANS
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Wednesday, 17 January 2018

NEW YORK STYLE DIARY: OUTFIT 2


HOODIE - TOPMAN (similar) / TROUSERS - ASOS / TRAINERS - OFFICE / HAT - URBAN OUTFITTERS 






Red really is one of my favourite colours at the moment. As the minimalism trend continues to die out and the maximalism trend starts to creep in, I think its necessary to start preparing your wardrobe by investing in coloured pieces. Since buying red trainers I've noticed that I am being more daring and buying colour so that I have clothes to cooridinate with the shoes. I suppose that is a way of getting the maximalism trend started. Get your self a pair of coloured shoes. 

On this day we visited Brooklyn. We wanted to escape the high end shops in Manhattan and look into American vintage and thrift shopping. These photographs are taken in a small market in Williamsburg that is just full of vintage clothing and accessories. It is defiantly a place that I could spend a lot of money. 

THANK YOU 

CLAYTON EVANS
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